Once you’ve housebroken and crate trained your Goldendoodle, you’ll both be ready for a new challenge. Here’s a suggestion: doorbell training! Learning this skill will be fun for your Goldendoodle, and your dog’s mastery will save you irritation and embarrassment.

Doorbell training?

‘Most people who love dogs have experienced walking through the front door and being greeted by a furry bundle of energy. What’s not to love? This creature thinks the world of you, displaying it by wagging his tail so hard he can barely keep itself from falling over.

He pushes his nose up under your hand to be petted and whines—not because he is hurt or sad, but because your coming back into his world is the greatest thing since a chew toy filled with peanut butter.

That’s all great until you’re sitting quietly at home with your Goldendoodle on the couch and the doorbell rings. Barking and excitement ensues. You’re expecting some friends to drop by for dinner. You open the door, and your guests are immediately greeted by your pet with almost as much exuberance as you see when you come in after you step out to check the mail.

Doorbells or someone knocking on the door can be triggers for any dog, especially one with such endless energy as a Goldendoodle puppy. Guess what? The doorbell can actually be used as a training device.

Teach your dog his place

Instead of the sound of the doorbell predicating a series of head-pounding barks and gymnast-like somersaults from the floor to the couch, it can be a signal for your dog to go to a “place” where it waits quietly.

The goal is for your dog to go to his place the moment he hears the doorbell ring. Some dogs will learn quicker than others — and your Goldendoodle’s Poodle heritage means that he’s smart and highly trainable. Still, it is going to be a matter of patience on your part. And it’s also going to be at least a two-person task.

You need to establish a “place” that your dog will go to each time the doorbell rings or someone knocks on the door. This can be a bed or the end of the sofa. Somewhere where he can see the door.

The process

One person stays in while the other goes outside. When the doorbell rings, the person inside tells the dog to go to his place. When he does, reward him with a bit of kibble or snack. Don’t forget to praise him and be excited.

The person outside comes in. Most excitable dogs will bound to greet them as they come in. We are trying to train that out of them. So, the dog must remain at his place when the person outside comes through the door. When he remains in place, reward him again. This builds positive association with the doorbell ringing and staying in place until released.

You may have to do this twenty or thirty times in the first session. Be consistent. Many dogs will start anticipating, and once the doorbell sounds, they will go to place without being told. That is the goal. Then change roles with the other person and do it again.

It shouldn’t take thirty tries the next session. But be consistent. And always remember to reward your dog and to be excited. Be as much a bundle of energy as your Goldendoodle is.

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